Entries by Chiaro (13)

Monday
Mar172014

TRUNK: The Movie

Feature Film

Directed, Edited and Produced by Martin de Valk

Screenplay by Keith Digby and Brian Paisley

Distributed by Industry Works Pictures

Cop or killer?  She’s convinced he murdered her daughter, and today is payback.  His pleas of innocence fall on deaf ears.  Lies are useless, mind games backfire, the truth doesn’t work.  In the end, the only way he can stop this death-ride could kill them both.

             A Claustrophobic Thriller

A MAN shakes the hurt and dizziness from his head.  Things come slowly into focus.  Coming around with a mighty pain - a whack from a baseball bat - prove to be the least of his problems.  He’s also locked in the stifling, almost airless trunk of a fast-moving rust-bucket of a car.  

 Then…

A WOMAN’S VOICE tells him this is his living coffin. She tells him this is where he starts to pay for his evil.  He’s being driven to the abandoned boathouse where he tortured and killed her ‘baby girl’. She tells him that when they reach their destination, he will die a very nasty death.

Fighting the panic that will undoubtedly make his death inevitable, he persuades her to talk to him.

He’s not the killer, he tells her. He’s an undercover cop— the only one in the force who still cares about her ‘baby girl’, the only one still working the case long after it has gone cold… the only one able to bring her daughter’s murderer to justice…  If she kills him, they both lose.  If he dies, so does the case, so does the last chance of making sure that the true killer pays.

Almost at the abandoned boathouse now, but he’s close to success.  He’s persuaded her that he’s not the one who deserves to die a pain-wracked death… but he can bring her the one who does.

As the trunk lid slowly opens, his eyes adjusting to the piercing blue light of the sky that promises him freedom, he says that one thing too many, and the lid slams shut on his hopes.

Now, his fate is sealed, unless he can succeed with a desperate plan that is do-or-die for both of them.

Ten minutes of terror later, after a frantic, last-ditch effort, after a scream of tearing metal, air filled with choking smoke and the smell of burning rubber… a body floats out from the lakeshore.

 

Monday
Mar172014

The Fantastic Logic of Eternity

1 x 1hr

Produced by Asterisk Productions

Vision TV

EDITED by Martin de Valk, Chiaro Productions

What do we mean when we invoke the ‘eternal’? This one hour program explores the concept of eternity, as expressed in art and pop culture, and by writers, physicists, religious scholars, and historians.

Monday
Mar172014

Patrick, Pagans, and Party Animals 

1 x 1hr

Produced by Asterisk Productions

Vision TV

EDITED by Martin de Valk, Chiaro Productions

The Amazing Legacy of St. Patrick of Ireland

Who was St. Patrick anyway? How muc is myth and legend? A one hour documentary behind the first green holiday, celebrated around the world. Broadcast premiere March

Thursday
Mar062014

Apocalypse... WHEN

5 x 1/2hr series

Produced by Asterisk Productions

VISION TV

EDITED by Martin de Valk, Chiaro Productions

A thinking person’s guide to the apocalypse (5 × 22 min.). Why do we keep anticipating the end of the world – an end that never materializes? And what happens when nothing happens? This series explores the origins, implications, psychology, theology and repercussions of Doomsday thinking.

Thursday
Mar062014

Back in the Day: seaon 2 - Life On the Prairies

Back in the Day – seaon 2 - Life On the Prairies
6x1/2hr Doc Series
APTN

Co-Produced with Sir Perphoulous Films

Directed and Edited by Martin de Valk

Alberta sits right on the border between the Rockies and the Prairies; creating a land as diverse in nature as it is in First Nations people.  Standing in one area you can see the mountains, the hills and the flats, at the same time you can be talking to the Dene, the Stony, the Cree and the Ojibway.    It’s also home to two central Cities, Calgary and Edmonton, where First Nations people from all over Alberta congregate; many of whom are searching for their roots.

Season two of Back in the Day will follow six men and women from these two cities, out into the Diverse Northern area of the province where they will be shown how to live as their ancestors did,  and given a chance to reconnect to their history.

Friday
Dec142012

K9 Mounties

K9 Mounties

6x1/2hr Doc Series
ANIMAL PLANET Canada

Directed and Edited by Martin de Valk

K9 Mounties follows the 17 week training program at the RCMP’s Police Dog Service Training Centre – and then follows up with 3 of the graduates as they put their training into action in the real world.

The dogs are carefully bred, specially selected dogs – mainly German and Belgian shepherds. They  are matched to  the personalities of their RCMP Police Dog Service handlers, and together, they go through an internationally recognized training program demanding self-motivation, tenacity and fitness from both dogs and handlers

Teamwork is the goal – to find lost people, track wrongdoers, search for explosives and drugs, and  protect VIPS.

From puppies to police dogs, K9 Mounties is a six part half hour series following an elite group of dogs and handlers.  We will run beside the dogs and handlers, tracking their progress, feeling their success and failures as they hone their skills, and bond into a team prepared to meet the challenges of the real world.

Tuesday
Feb152011

Back in the Day: On the Mighty Fraser

Back in the Day SEASON 1

LEO Award Winner 2010 - Best Documentary Series  

6x1/2hr Doc Series
APTN

Co-Produced with Sir Perphoulous Films

Directed and Edited by Martin de Valk

It’s a question that’s been asked since Natives first left their traditional lands and moved into the city: how would I fare against my ancestors?

Back in the Day… aims to answer that question by taking six First Nations people from downtown Vancouver and putting them out into the wilds of British Columbia. Our collection of natives come from all walks of life; from a social worker on the eastside to an aspiring actor. 

Are they up to the task? How will they respond to a closed environment where the corner store no longer exists? Can they survive in “the past”?

Our participants will learn how to do everything from a traditional salmon catch to making their own shelters in the bush. 

Experiencing this steep learning curve will undoubtedly create an array of feelings and new appreciation. From frustration to euphoria our participants will be relying on their ability to adapt, communicate and initiate.

How will they respond to the challenge and a way of life only known to them through stories?

We will document our participants as they encounter personal and physical challenges in their attempt to succeed within the group.

The participants will be located in an isolated environment. They will have no access to the outside world except to ask for guidance from our Elders and Guides.

Back in the Day… is an intriguing journey into the past with the youth of today.

What will they come away with? A better understanding of our ancestors? A sense of relief, they we no longer live like that? Or a sense of loss? Back in the Day is about Young Aboriginal Adults reconnecting with tradition. 

For our audience, Back in the Day… will open a door into a living history few of us have ever seen.

Wednesday
Feb092011

Survival of the Fittest: Stories from the West Coast Trail

Survival of the Fittest

LEO Award nomination 2008 Best Documentary Program - Nature/Environment/Adventure

1 x 1hr Doc 
CTVglobemedia, A Channels
International Pay TV: Scandinavia & Eastern Europe /  Free TV: Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Hungary

Directed and Edited by Martin de Valk

Survival of the Fittest: Stories from the West Coast Trail is a heartbeat ride encompassing the sweat, stamina, and down-right stubbornness of the people on a quest to test their physical, emotional, and psychological prowess as they engange with Mother Nature.

This ain't no set-up of athletes or over-exercised actors. This is ordinary, everyday people engaging with real challenges that they have planned and anticipated for many months.

Survival of the Fittest: Stories from the West Coast Trail tracks the geographical journey and personal challenges one goes through to succeed at conquering the physical and environmental challenges that lure them off the couch and into the great outdoors.

Ever wonder what its like to carry a 50lb backpack over 75kilometers of rugged west coast terrain? It may seem like boot camp, or a punitive episode of Survivor, but in reality, it is the world-renowned West Coast Trail, located on the wild and remote west coast of Vancouver Island.

Everyday between May and September, 60 people from across Canada and around the world leave from either end of the 75 km trail embarking on a test of fitness and durability.

From 100 foot vertical ladders snugly fitted against rock faces, the the self propelled cable cars crossing rivers, the hihg tide charts and boat crossings by the local Native Band. Once you begin there is no way out unless you finish, turn back, or injure yourself. The Park Rescue Squad will only come if a real physical injury threatens your existance.

This is an expedition of a lifetime. Where smelly socks and muddy boots mingle with flickering fires and the unparalleled magic of the majestic Pacific.

Wednesday
Feb092011

Good to Go: Pitch to Premiere

Good to GO
13 x ½ hr Doc Series
CTVglobemedia, A Channels, CLT
Directed and Edited by Martin de Valk
 
Buckle up. Good to GO is a thirteen part ride through the creative process of film making. From pitch to planning to production to premiere – you’re in the front row for the exhilaration, the stress and the grit of movie making – where the dream fulfilled collides with the hard reality of the business. Get ready for that.
Good to GO is a documentary series that will provide you with unequalled access to the lives of the filmmakers on their journey to fulfilling a dream. Filmmaking can be lonely, frustrating work punctuated by moments of sheer madness, and like a birth, it is exhilarating, euphoric, and wonderfully intense.
The Pitch: Eight short listed teams have assembled to pitch their ideas. Each team will have less than thirty minutes to sell their project, and themselves, to the selection committee. Each team runs its own race, but only the selection committee can determine the finish line.
The pitch teams have been promised a quick decision. It’s what they want, but the selection committee struggles with the variety, the volume and the value of the projects. Seven of the eight teams didn’t win. They knew the odds going in.
The Winning Team: The script is ready, stripped down to reflect the limited budget. With just 15 weeks prep, shoot and edit, can the director make his ‘film’, and not the TV movie he fears it will become?
Rough and Tumble Business: Art versus business, creative versus commerce. It is the eternal struggle in the movie industry, between the director meeting his needs and the producers meeting their budget
The classic movie formula, get a million dollars, make a movie. Easy, right? Ask the Producer and Director. Do they have enough material on film to actually make the movie work? Visit the Good to Go Web Page for more info.

Buckle up. Good to GO is a thirteen part ride through the creative process of film making. From pitch to planning to production to premiere – you’re in the front row for the exhilaration, the stress and the grit of movie making – where the dream fulfilled collides with the hard reality of the business. Get ready for that.
Good to GO is a documentary series that will provide you with unequalled access to the lives of the filmmakers on their journey to fulfilling a dream. Filmmaking can be lonely, frustrating work punctuated by moments of sheer madness, and like a birth, it is exhilarating, euphoric, and wonderfully intense.
The Pitch: Eight short listed teams have assembled to pitch their ideas. Each team will have less than thirty minutes to sell their project, and themselves, to the selection committee. Each team runs its own race, but only the selection committee can determine the finish line.
The pitch teams have been promised a quick decision. It’s what they want, but the selection committee struggles with the variety, the volume and the value of the projects. Seven of the eight teams didn’t win. They knew the odds going in.
The Winning Team: The script is ready, stripped down to reflect the limited budget. With just 15 weeks prep, shoot and edit, can the director make his ‘film’, and not the TV movie he fears it will become?
Rough and Tumble Business: Art versus business, creative versus commerce. It is the eternal struggle in the movie industry, between the director meeting his needs and the producers meeting their budget
The classic movie formula, get a million dollars, make a movie. Easy, right? Ask the Producer and Director. Do they have enough material on film to actually make the movie work? Visit the Good to Go Web Page for more info.

Monday
Feb072011

Family Tree Narrative

Family Tree Narrative
6x1/2 hr Doc Series
APTN, SCN, Book Television

Directed and Edited by Martin de Valk

Assu of Cape Mudge - The Assu family—their name meaning “a father that’s highly respected”—descend from Chief Billy Assu, the last hereditary chief of the We Wai Kai band (Kwakwaka’wakw) in Cape Mudge, a tiny community on the southwest shore of BC’s Quadra Island. Donald Assu, his siblings and children discuss the continued importance of the potlatch ceremony to their family and their people—its history, its songs, the poetic and ancient language of big-house orators, and thepassing on of traditional names.

Marchand of the Okanagan - The Okanagan people are a nation running through two countries. The Marchand family came to their BC home when their grandmother Mary Ann rode up from Washington State by horseback. Len Marchand, his sister Pauline Chiba and her daughter Valerie share the stories of their ancestors who farmed, fished, gardened, picked berries and sold cordwood to sustain the family. Len, who became the country’s first Native MP as part of Trudeau’s 1968 election team, discusses his grandmother’s influence on his sense of identity and how starkly it contrasted with the public image of his people at that pivotal point in Canadian history.

Lavallee of the Piapot - From his home on the Piapot reserve in the Qu’Appelle Valley of Saskatchewan, medicine man Ray Lavallee has spent his life preserving and sharing the spiritual traditions of his Cree ancestors. He talks about his reverence for his grandfather, who could communicate with spirits, and his grandmother, whose work as a medicine woman focused on delivering babies. He gathers many of his medicines on the patch of virgin prairie that he and his wife Tillie have nurtured.

Dorion of Prince Albert and Cumberland House - Leah Dorion and her aunts Isabelle Impey and Elsie Sanderson can follow the roots of their Saskatchewan family back 10 generations, all the way to the ville du Québec in the 1600s. In the process, Leah has discovered the great mobility of her Métis ancestors, who not only migrated across Canada but also travelled widely through the U.S. These women relate the details of a complicated lineage that has seen some branches of the family become Treaty Indians while others did not; the mixing of bloodlines as diverse as Cree, French, Ojibwa, Yankton Sioux and Iowa; and the tale of a First World War vet who was removed from treaty when he returned from the front.

Hungry Wolf of the Blood Tribe - Beverly Hungry Wolf, author of The Ways of My Grandmothers, is a member of the Blood Tribe of the Blackfoot people. Her traditional home in southern Alberta is just under Chief Mountain on land chosen by Chief Red Crow. Beverly and her family discuss the significance of beaver bundles for their people’s healing and spiritual traditions, the importance of learning one’s history, and their community’s renewed interest in their ancestors’ way of life.

Dion of the Kehewin - Joe Dion, Florence Buffalo and Madeline Dion, of the Kehewin Reserve in Alberta’s northeast corner, can trace their family line back to the venerable Cree chief Big Bear. Joe talks about his visit with the Queen during the Alberta Centennial, as head of a delegation seeking redress for Treaty 6. He explains that he didn’t want to see the constitution repatriated without Native rights
being enshrined. His sister Madeline, widely recognized for her work on women’s health issues, discusses the systematic erasing of memory that her people have had to overcome. Florence explains her sense of responsibility to her children in passing on family lore.